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Magnetic Flux from 0 to 15 degree Optimization search successive models

Minimizing the Cogging Torque in a Brushless DC Motor

Motors & generators with MagNet

Cogging torque is an undesirable effect that prevents the smooth rotation of the rotor and results in noise. In this example, OptiNet is used with MagNet in order to minimize the cogging torque by varying the geometry yet maintaining a certain running torque in a brushless dc motor.

The rotor and stator use a laminated structure and there are four permanent magnets on the rotor, each magnetized to alternate between north and south.

This optimization run took an hour to complete and resulted in reducing the cogging torque by 77%

4 pole 12 slot brushless dc motor in MagNet

METHODS and RESULTS

MAGNETIC FLUX from 0 to 15 DEGREES

The video shows the the magnetic flux at every angle between 0 and 15 degrees - which is sufficient to predict the cogging torque. Though we show the full motor, only one quarter of it was used for the simulation.

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Brushless DC DESIGN VARIABLES for OPTIMIZING

The geometry of the motor is defined based on the parameters shown in this figure. The parameter MH is the magnet height, AG is the width of the air gap, TFA is the tooth face angle and TH is the tooth height. In OptiNet, a minimum and a maximum value for each variable is specified. OptiNet then searches within this range to find the optimum design.

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OPTIMIZING the GEOMETRY for MINIMAL COGGING TORQUE

Minimizing the cogging torque over a 15 degree span is defined as the goal. This is set by specifying the maximum value permitted for the cogging torque, any design that exceeds this limit will be rejected.

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DEFINING the RUNNING TORQUE CRITERIA

There is one constraint in this optimization: the running torque should be maintained at or above the specified value.

In MagNet, it is possible to use parameterization for the stator winding current so that the system automatically solves both at zero current and with current as a function of rotor position, all in one run. OptiNet will then obtain the cogging torque and running torque values directly from MagNet.

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ITERATIONS of the OPTIMIZATION

For every iteration of the optimization process, OptiNet updates and displays the changes for the goal, variables, objectives, and constraints -- these graphs are displayed on the Progress page. In this example, each of the four variables' graphs is updated as OptiNet finds a new design.

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OPTIMIZATION RESULTS for MINIMAL COGGING TORQUE

OptiNet produces a report for each optimization run. In this report, the designs that satisfy the constraints are shown in the order that they are improved. In this case for the brushless dc motor, 7 improved solutions were found. The value for each of the 4 geometric variables, as well as the predicted cogging and running torque is reported.

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COMPARING INITIAL & OPTIMIZED BRUSHLESS DC Motor

The cogging torque over a 15 degree span for the initial and optimized design are compared on this graph. Cogging torque has been reduced by 77% from 0.2510 Nm to 0.0568 Nm.

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EVOLUTION of the BLDC GEOMETRY

OptiNet produced the final design of the motor after running for 64 minutes on an Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2600 (3.40GHz, 8 Core). The video shows the successive models evaluated by OptiNet and MagNet.

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